Fare Kerry to Queensland 1884

Kerry Sentinel 6 June 1884

11 Comments

  1. Greg Burns Greg Burns
    November 17, 2017    

    Hi Kay, Thank you for posting this very interesting article. It was at the same time, 1884, that my John Healy and wife Margaret Falvey Healy had departed from Ballymacelligott, Tralee to Australia. I would guess that he layed eyes on this article or one like it at some point. His sister, Bridget Healy Sheehan(Sheehy) was my 2x great grandmother.. She departed Flemby, Ballymac at about the same time with her children, James, Ellen, Mary and Denis in tow returning to America after a nearly 10 year stay. He husband, Denis, died at Flemby in 1874. Very interesting stuff indeed.

    • Kay Caball Kay Caball
      November 17, 2017    

      Greg, thanks for the comments. i am working on a Ballymac story and should have it in the next week or so for a blog. Its a memoir that needs a bit of editing. Kay

  2. Mary Ellen Golden Mary Ellen Golden
    November 17, 2017    

    Interesting,thank you.My great-grandmother Mary Lombard Curtayne arrived in New York City in May of 1885 .She was a widow with 7 children and lived inAghadoe.Are there any flyers showing information about passage to NY ?

    • Kay Caball Kay Caball
      November 17, 2017    

      Mary Ellen thank you for your comments. Yes I also have a couple for New York. I will be publishing Liverpool to New York, via Queenstown 1884, on Sunday.

      • Marge Marge
        November 17, 2017    

        Do you have anything on Liverpool to Montreal in the 1840s-50s? My Irish gggrandparents (Jeremiah Doyle and Mary Shea), from Co. Kerry, left in (probably) Sept. 1847 on the “coffin” ship Lord Ashburton, arriving in Montreal weeks later as the last (or next last) vessel to arrive there before the St. Lawrence froze for the winter. Many passengers and crew had sickened and died en route or arrived sick that able-bodied passengers had to help dock the vessel. I don’t know whether the ship originally was to go to NYC or Boston and was turned away because of the disease situation on board or the ports were already overloaded with too many immigrants, some of the arriving sick. Or did they choose Canada as a destination because the fare from Liverpool was apparently cheaper than to US ports?

        They were married in early 1848 (at the Basilica of Notre Dame in Montreal), and I suspect they took off in the spring or summer of that year for USA (perhaps their intended destination all along). I wonder how they traveled—on foot, partly by rides in farmers’ wagons, either by arrangement (for pay) or by “hitch-hiking,” or perhaps partly by water? Their first child, my ggrandmother (Nellie/Ellen/Helen) was born in Vermont in 1849. They found the climate there daunting and farming too difficult so not terribly long thereafter headed for West Bergen, NY, where most of the rest of their children were born before heading for Kalamazoo Co., Michigan. Apparently, part of their travel to NY then was by the quite well-developed NY State canal system (the N-S ones and then the Erie Canal).

        I also don’t know how they got from Kerry (between Kenmare and Sneem) to Liverpool. Did they go overland or by water to Cork/Queenstown and then to Liverpool? to somewhere else in Ireland and then across to Liverpool? almost entirely by sea from somewhere in Kerry to Liverpool? Do you or anybody else have any info on the options?

        • Kay Caball Kay Caball
          November 20, 2017    

          Marge, I don’t have anything specifically on Liverpool to Montreal in 1847. Between 1849 – 1851, quite a number of ships left the Port of Tralee (Blennerville) for Canada – to Quebec and St Johns New Brunswick.
          Jeremiah Doyle and Mary Shea from he southern half of Kerry would probably have travelled to Queenstown or Tralee. In both cases they would have walked mostly and may have travelled sometimes on carts that were on the same route. The London and Limerick Steamship steamers left Blennerville regularly for British ports including Liverpool. The cost of passage in fore cabin or steerage from Tralee to Liverpool in 1855 was 10s 6d. Tralee to Nova Scotia was £3. It was more expensive to go directly to the United States, £4.6s.0d. Tralee to New York.

          • Marge Marge
            November 27, 2017    

            Thanks for your thoughts and info on this. My guess is that my gggrandparents took the cheapest option for every aspect of the journey. The Lord Ashburton (a sailing vessel) carried almost 500 people and possibly had the least expensive fare available. Of course, a huge number died at sea and more upon arrival in Canada. Some years back I recall reading something online about fares in the 1840s, conditions in Liverpool, and advice for emigrants, but where that info is or was eludes me now. Thinking I might find it via Marjorie Kohli’s website section on immigration to Canada, I revisited her site, which I hadn’t done for a long time. She has a wealth of info (and links) about immigration to Canada (mostly Irish). I didn’t find there what I was looking for but did find some info on her site about the Lord Ashburton that wasn’t there when I previously used it.
            http://jubilation.uwaterloo.ca/marj/genealogy/thevoyage.html

          • Kay Caball Kay Caball
            November 27, 2017    

            Marge, thank you for giving me that link to the Immigrants to Canada website. I wasn’t aware of it and its very comprehensive.

  3. M Lucas M Lucas
    November 17, 2017    

    Very interesting

  4. Marie Goodwin Marie Goodwin
    November 20, 2017    

    Kay thank you for posting this. Very interesingt for me. The agent P M Goodwin (Patrick) was my Great Grandfather. We know little about him as he died when my grandfather Thomas was only 9 years in 1900. Quite sad really as his wife Margaret (nee O’Donnell) died a few months later as did their 17 year old daughter Mary. They left behind 4 boys the youngest being my Grandfather. Patrick was one of Maharees Goodwins. People died so young back then.

    • Kay Caball Kay Caball
      November 20, 2017    

      Marie, thank you for your comment which will be published on the blog under the Queensland page. Your genealogy is very interesting – I know about how impotant the Goodwins were to the Maharees and your comment and others like are a great help to other people tracing their ancestors in Kerry.

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